On Correlating Aphasic Errors with Speech Errors in Mandarin

| January 8, 2014

August 2007. Volume 2 Issue 1

Title
On Correlating Aphasic Errors with Speech Errors in Mandarin*

Author
I-Ping Wan
National Chengchi University and Harvard University

Bio-Data
I-Ping Wan received her Ph.D. in Linguistics from the Department of Linguistics and a Ph.D. certificate from the Center for Cognitive Science, at SUNY-Buffalo, in 1999. She has been teaching at the Graduate Institute of Linguistics, National Chengchi University, Taiwan, since fall 2000. Her recent research has focused on gathering aphasic and speech-error evidence in Mandarin to examine how such findings will be incorporated into the phonological constructs and psycholinguistic models of speech production planning. Some of the related work has been published in Phonology, Journal of East Asian Linguistics, Lingua, and Journal of Chinese Linguistics. She is currently a Visiting Scholar in the Department of Linguistics at Harvard University in 2006-2007. Her research areas include phonology, phonetics, psycholinguistics and cognitive science.

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Abstract:
The present study shows that the distribution of errors in aphasic speech, despite some minor differences, closely resembles to that of errors made by normal speakers. The most consistent findings in the phonological analyses of aphasic speech are the relative uniformity of error types and error distributions within each aphasic group. Differences between the errors manifest themselves most clearly in the treatment of the hierarchy of the phonological units occurring in errors, the contextual influences, and directionality in relation to the error utterance. These differences show the ways in which the speech production system of aphasic speakers differs from that of normal speakers. Such findings may also be incorporated into the phonological structure and psycholinguistic models of speech production planning.

Keywords: aphasic errors, speech errors, Mandarin, psycholinguistic models

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Category: 2007