2009 – The Linguistics Journal https://www.linguistics-journal.com TESOL Linguistics Thu, 22 Jun 2017 07:43:27 +0000 en-US hourly 1 Language Identity and Culture through English as a Lingua Franca in Asia : Notes from the Field. https://www.linguistics-journal.com/2014/01/07/language-identity-and-culture-through-english-as-a-lingua-franca-in-asia-notes-from-the-field-2/ Tue, 07 Jan 2014 07:17:38 +0000 https://www.linguistics-journal.com/www2/2014/01/07/language-identity-and-culture-through-english-as-a-lingua-franca-in-asia-notes-from-the-field-2/ Special Edition, September 2009,
Language, Culture and Identity in Asia.

| September 2009 home | PDF version |

Title
Language, Culture and Identity through English as a Lingua Franca in Asia: Notes from the Field

Will Baker
University of Southampton, UK

Biodata
He currently teaches Applied Linguistics/ELT at the University of Southampton. He completed a PhD in Applied Linguistics at Southampton on the subject of intercultural awareness and intercultural communication through English in Asia. Before coming to Southampton in 2005, he taught at Silpakorn University in Thailand. He has worked as an English language teacher for over 10 years in both the UK and Thailand. His research interests include: intercultural awareness, intercultural communication, English as a Lingua Franca, English language teaching, and second language learning.

Abstract
This article will discuss what the concepts of language, culture and identity mean in relation to English used as a lingua franca (ELF) in Asia. It will be argued that English functions as a language of communication in Asia that should be viewed as separate from the traditional ‘native speaker’ norms. To support this, the discussion will draw on data from an ethnographic study of seven users of English in Thailand. The data suggests that English in this context is used to articulate and enact cultures and identities which are fluid, liminal and emerge in situ. This challenges existing categorisations of languages, cultures and identities; in particular, the supposedly inexorable links between a target language and target culture. Furthermore, such dynamic and emergent notions of cultures, languages and identities expressed through English have important implications for the teaching of English in Asia and other lingua franca contexts.

Key words: English as a lingua franca, culture, language, identity, Asia, English language teaching

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Vygotsky and Linguistic Relativity: The Case of Chinese and English Reading https://www.linguistics-journal.com/2014/01/07/vygotsky-and-linguistic-relativity-the-case-of-chinese-and-english-reading/ Tue, 07 Jan 2014 07:06:51 +0000 https://www.linguistics-journal.com/www2/2014/01/07/vygotsky-and-linguistic-relativity-the-case-of-chinese-and-english-reading/ May 2009. Volume 4 Issue 1
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Title
Vygotsky and Linguistic Relativity: The Case of Chinese and English Reading

Author
John F. Ehrich
Research Fellow, School for Social and Policy Research
Charles Darwin University, Australia

Bio-Data
John Ehrich has worked for over ten years as an ESL teacher and teacher of English to native speakers. He has also worked as a curriculum designer for primary school social studies student and has recently completed a Ph.D. in cognitive psychology at Queensland University of Technology.


 

Abstract

This paper argues the case of linguistic relativity through a Vygotskyan socio-cultural perspective. A major tenet of Vygotskyan socio-cultural theory is that sign systems (e.g., language) are psychological tools, which after a period of internalization, result in a transformation of inner processing. The logical extension of Vygotskyan socio-cultural theory is that the internalization of different sign systems, such as Chinese logographic characters or English alphabetic script, should invariably result in the development of distinct types of inner processing. This argument is essentially one of linguistic relativity, or the idea that the nature of language itself can impact on cognitive processing. Evidence to support this argument is found in behavioural and neuroanatomical studies. Finally, some implications to ESL pedagogy are discussed within a relativist framework.

Keywords: Vygotsky, linguistic relativity, Chinese reading, orthography, socio-cultural theory

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Parametric Variation of the 3rd Person Singular in English and Some Nigerian Languages https://www.linguistics-journal.com/2014/01/07/parametric-variation-of-the-3rd-person-singular-in-english-and-some-nigerian-languages/ Tue, 07 Jan 2014 07:05:37 +0000 https://www.linguistics-journal.com/www2/2014/01/07/parametric-variation-of-the-3rd-person-singular-in-english-and-some-nigerian-languages/ May 2009. Volume 4 Issue 1
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Title
Parametric Variation of the 3RD Person Singular in English and Some Nigerian Languages

Author
Lamidi, M. T.
Department of English,
Faculty of Arts,
University of Ibadan, Nigeria.

Bio-Data
Dr. Lamidi’s areas of interest include the syntax of contact linguistics and contrastive linguistics. He identified the grammatical basis of Yorùbá-English Code-Switching and is currently looking at the phenomenon of code switching in virtual communities. He has also contributed to the codification of the grammatical structure of the Nigerian Variety of English. He has published in books and journals both locally and internationally.


 

Abstract

The third person singular is unique in English grammar as the only form that differs from the other grammatical persons. Curiously, the same phenomenon of the third person is replicated in a number of Nigerian languages. Working within the minimalist program, the study offers a cross-linguistic exploration of the third person singular effect on subject, object and possessive pronouns in different languages. Based on data analysis of English, Yorùbá, Igbo and Hausa languages, the paper suggests that the uniqueness of the third person singular is possibly a universal trait with differences being peculiar to each language or dialect. In addition, it proposes the inclusion of tone among lexical items selected for computation in the working area.

Keywords: English, Nigerian languages, third person singular effect, tone, features

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The Generic Structure and Discourse Strategies Employed in Downward Request E-mails https://www.linguistics-journal.com/2014/01/07/the-generic-structure-and-discourse-strategies-employed-in-downward-request-e-mails/ Tue, 07 Jan 2014 07:04:00 +0000 https://www.linguistics-journal.com/www2/2014/01/07/the-generic-structure-and-discourse-strategies-employed-in-downward-request-e-mails/ May 2009. Volume 4 Issue 1
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Title
The Generic Structure and Discourse Strategies Employed in Downward Request E-mails

Author
Victor Ho
Macquarie University, Australia

Bio-Data
Victor Chung-kwong Ho has been a lecturer at the Language Centre of Hong Kong Baptist University and is now working as Research Associate at the university whilst undertaking his Ph.D. studies in linguistics from Macquarie University.


 

Abstract

This paper aims to investigate the generic structure and discourse strategies employed by the leaders of a multi-cultural group of educators in making downward requests through internal e-mails. The request e-mails used in the study were addressed to either the Chinese or non-Chinese members of the group. Bhatia’s (2004) multi-perspective model of genre analysis is drawn upon to reveal the following features of the e-mails: (1) generic structures, (2) intertextuality, and (3) lexico-grammar. Different generic structures and discourse strategies were found in the e-mails. An attempt has been made to explain such generic and discoursal differences in terms of the cultural background of the e-mail users (both senders and recipients) and the rank of imposition of the requested acts.

Key words: request, genre, intertextuality, lexico-grammar

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A Comparison of International and Chinese Journal Article Abstracts: From Move Structure to Transitivity analysis https://www.linguistics-journal.com/2014/01/07/a-comparison-of-international-and-chinese-journal-article-abstracts-from-move-structure-to-transitivity-analysis/ Tue, 07 Jan 2014 07:02:54 +0000 https://www.linguistics-journal.com/www2/2014/01/07/a-comparison-of-international-and-chinese-journal-article-abstracts-from-move-structure-to-transitivity-analysis/ May 2009. Volume 4 Issue 1
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Title
A Comparison of International and Chinese Journal Article Abstracts: From Move Structure to Transitivity Analysis

Author
Ping Huang
The College of Foreign Languages,
Chongqing University, P.R China

Bio-Data
Ping Huang is a professor working at the College of Foreign Languages, Chongqing University, P.R China. She obtained her doctorate in the University of South Australia in 2007. Her recent published research focuses on ESP teaching and the training of university subject teachers to teach bilingually in China. These research interests also involve her in systemic functional linguistics and genre analysis.


 

Abstract
This paper compares international and Chinese TESOL research article abstracts (RAAs) written in English using Swales’ (1981, 1990) move structure model and Halliday’s (1994) description of Transitivity Processes and lexis. A small corpus was established with 64 journal RAAs written in English from four international TESOL-related journals and four Chinese TESOL journals written in English in 2003. The results show that (1) the four structural moves of Swales’ (1981, 1990) model were evident in both abstract sets but were differently distributed; (2) the distribution of transitivity processes in the journal article abstract moves was related to the move structure; and (3) lexical analysis provides further evidence of Swales’ (1981, 1990) move structure. The research suggests the need for TESOL practitioners to consider these factors in preparing RAAs.

Key words: genre analysis, transitivity process, move analysis, lexis

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Part-of-Speech Tagging for Grammar Checking of Punjabi https://www.linguistics-journal.com/2014/01/07/part-of-speech-tagging-for-grammar-checking-of-punjabi/ Tue, 07 Jan 2014 07:01:23 +0000 https://www.linguistics-journal.com/www2/2014/01/07/part-of-speech-tagging-for-grammar-checking-of-punjabi/ May 2009. Volume 4 Issue 1
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Title
Part-of-Speech Tagging for Grammar Checking of Punjabi

Authors
Mandeep Singh Gill & Gurpreet Singh Lehal
Punjabi University, Patiala, India
Shiv Sharma Joshi
Punjabi University, Patiala, India

Bio-Data
Mandeep Singh Gill received his master’s in software engineering from Thapar University, Patiala, India in 2003. His research interests include natural language processing and software testing. He is currently working on developing software for grammar checking of Punjabi, for his Ph.D.
Gurpreet Singh Lehal is currently head of Computer Science Department, Punjabi University Patiala and Director of Advanced Centre for Technical Development of Punjabi Language, Literature and Culture. Dr. Lehal has published more than 30 papers in national/international journals and proceedings of leading conferences. His main areas of interest are optical character recognition and natural language processing.

Shiv Sharma Joshi received his master’s and Ph.D. in Linguistics from University of London, London. Dr. Joshi, a renowned linguistic, is member of various professional bodies, and has authored three books, four dictionaries, and approximately one hundred research papers. His specializations include Punjabi phonology and instrumental (acoustic) phonetics. Lexicography, computational linguistics, and teaching of Punjabi as a foreign language form his current research interests.


 

Abstract

Part-of-speech (POS) tagging is one of the major activities performed in a typical natural language processing application. This paper explores part-of-speech tagging for the Punjabi language, a member of the Modern Indo-Aryan family of languages. A tagset for use in grammar checking and other similar applications is proposed. This fine-grained tagset is based entirely on the grammatical categories involved in various types of concord in typical Punjabi sentences. The morpho-syntactic features taken in this tagset are largely based on the inflectional morphology of Punjabi words. The motivation behind devising this tagset, with focus on agreement features of these languages, is that there is no tagset available for Punjabi or other Indian languages. The tagsets for other languages do not cover all the grammatical features, which are required for agreement checking in Punjabi texts. A rule-based tagger derived from this tagset is also described. This will be the first published POS tagger for Punjabi. The tagset described in this paper is recommended for grammar checking and other similar applications for the languages sharing grammatical features with Punjabi, more specifically the languages of the Modern Indo-Aryan family.

Key Words: morphology, part-of-speech tagging, tagset, grammar checking, computational linguistics, Punjabi

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Foreword – May 2009 https://www.linguistics-journal.com/2014/01/07/foreword-may-2009/ Tue, 07 Jan 2014 06:56:50 +0000 https://www.linguistics-journal.com/www2/2014/01/07/foreword-may-2009/ Foreword. May 2009. Volume 4 Issue 1 .

Welcome to the Spring 2009 edition of The Linguistics Journal in which we are pleased to present five articles from diverse linguistic contexts. Due to increased interest in the journal in the last year, a warm welcome is extended to new editors appointed to the review team and especially to Benjamin Schmeiser who has taken over production duties from Marcus Otlowski. I would like to take this opportunity to thank Marcus for his tireless efforts in preparing many papers for past editions. Thanks, as always, is extended to those who have supervised, reviewed and prepared the papers in this edition.

The first paper on “Part-of-Speech Tagging for Grammar Checking of Punjabi” by Mandeep Singh Gill, Gurpreet Singh Lehal, and Shiv Sharma Joshi investigates the use of a new tagset device for the Punjabi language and presents ground-breaking innovations in parts-of-speech tagging. The authors recommend this for grammar checking of not only Punjabi but also other languages of the Modern Indo-Aryan family.

In Ping Huang’s comparison of international and Chinese journal article abstracts, Swales’ (1981, 1990) move structure model and Halliday’s (1994) description of Transitivity Processes and lexis are employed to analyze a small corpus. Findings reveal important messages for writers preparing abstracts for academic journal submission in terms of structural moves and their distribution, the distribution of Transitivity Processes related to the move structure, and lexical analysis of Swales’ move structure.

In Victor Ho’s paper the use of downward requests in emails by a multi-cultural group of teachers is investigated using Bhatia’s (2004) model of genre analysis. Three features of generic structures, intertextuality, and lexico-grammar are revealed in the messages and explained in terms of the cultural background of both the senders and recipients. Insights are also gained as to the rank of imposition of the requested acts.

The next article by M. T. Lamidi investigates the parametric variation of the 3rd person singular in English and Nigerian languages. This study explores the third person singular effect on subject, object and possessive pronouns in English, Yorùbá, Igbo and Hausa languages and concludes that its uniqueness is possibly similar across the languages.

The final paper by John F. Ehrich considers Chinese and English reading from the perspective of studies in Vygotskyan socio-cultural theory and linguistic relativity. Ehrich puts forward the case that according to socio-cultural theory, the internalization of Chinese logographic characters or English alphabetic script leads to distinct inner processing, i.e. that language itself influences cognitive processing, an argument which is seen in behavioural and neuroanatomical studies.

I hope you enjoy reading this selection of papers and look forward to your own submissions.

John Adamson
Senior Associate Editor
The Linguistics Journal


 Volume 4. Issue 1. May 2009

Table of Contents:

Foreword by Dr. John Adamson

1. Mandeep Singh Gill, Gurpreet Singh Lehal, & Shiv Sharma Joshi. Part-of-Speech Tagging for Grammar Checking of Punjabi

2. Ping Huang. A Comparison of International and Chinese Journal Article Abstracts: From Move Structure to Transitivity analysis

3. Victor Ho. The Generic Structure and Discourse Strategies Employed in Downward Request E-mails

4. M.T. Lamidi. Parametric Variation of the 3rd Person Singular in English and Some Nigerian Languages

5. John F. Ehrich. Vygotsky and Linguistic Relativity: The Case of Chinese and English Reading

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The Santals of Bangladesh https://www.linguistics-journal.com/2014/01/07/the-santals-of-bangladesh/ Tue, 07 Jan 2014 06:54:58 +0000 https://www.linguistics-journal.com/www2/2014/01/07/the-santals-of-bangladesh/ September 2009

Special Edition, September 2009, Language, Culture and Identity in Asia.

September 2009 home | PDF version |

Title
The Santals of Bangladesh

Authors
Francesco Cavallaro# and Tania Rahman*‡

#Division of Linguistics and Multilingual Studies, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore
*Department of English Language and Literature, National Institute of Education, Singapore
‡Corresponding author

Biodata
Francesco Cavallaro is an Assistant Professor in the Division of Linguistics and Multilingual Studies at Nanyang Technological University, Singapore. He has worked at various Universities in Australia and he is now living and working in Singapore. His research interests are in sociolinguistics and bilingualism. He has published on language maintenance and shift, the demographics of the Italians in Australia, language attitudes in Singapore and on the use of technology in the classroom. He is the author of the forthcoming book “Sicilians in Australia: Language shift and maintenance”, published by The Italian Australian Institute. La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia.

Tania Rahman is studying MA in Applied Linguistics at the department of English Language and Literature at National Institute of Education, Singapore. She also holds an MA in Applied Linguistics and ELT and a Bachelor of Arts in English from the Department of English, University of Dhaka, Bangladesh. She has worked as a lecturer at the Department of English of Dhaka City College in Dhaka. Her current research interest is revitalizing languages of ethnic minorities. Other fields of interest are Language Planning and Policy, Second Language Acquisition, Teacher Education, Needs Analysis and English Language Teaching.

Abstract

The Santals, a significant community among the forty five distinctive minority groups in Bangladesh, possess a rich cultural heritage and their language, Santali, bears their unique cultural identity. Over the years voices have been raised for legal rights for the indigenous minorities of the world and for the preservation of indigenous languages. With its rich cultural heritage and history, the Santali language has a unique value for the Santals and deserves special attention for conservation. A multilingual education system with provisions for mother tongue education is a way to promote awareness for their endangered linguistic heritage and can be an effective way to enable indigenous people in Bangladesh to learn their traditional language, the national language, Bangla, along with English. This paper first gives a detailed description of the Santals and their language. Issues of linguistic rights are discussed in the context of indigenous people in Bangladesh, and suggestions are made for the process of integrated public involvement in the multilingual education process for the Santals.

Key words: Indigenous people, Language Revitalization, Language Maintenance, Language rights, Santals, Santali, Bilingual/ Multilingual Education.

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Language Policies- Impact on Language Maintenance and Teaching : Focus on Malaysia, Singapore, Brunei and the Philippines. https://www.linguistics-journal.com/2014/01/07/language-policies-impact-on-language-maintenance-and-teaching-focus-on-malaysia-singapore-brunei-and-the-philippines/ Tue, 07 Jan 2014 06:53:20 +0000 https://www.linguistics-journal.com/www2/2014/01/07/language-policies-impact-on-language-maintenance-and-teaching-focus-on-malaysia-singapore-brunei-and-the-philippines/ Special Edition, September 2009,
Language, Culture and Identity in Asia.

September 2009 home | PDF version |

Title
Language Policies – Impact on Language Maintenance and Teaching: Focus on Malaysia, Singapore, Brunei and the Philippines1

Authors
Maya Khemlani David#, Francesco Cavallaro* and Paolo Coluzzi‡ 2
#University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia; *Nanyang Technological University, Singapore; ‡Universiti Brunei Darussalam, Brunei Darussalam

Biodata
Francesco Cavallaro is an Assistant Professor in the Division of Linguistics and Multilingual Studies at Nanyang Technological University, Singapore. He has worked at various Universities in Australia and he is now living and working in Singapore. His research interests are in sociolinguistics and bilingualism. He has published on language maintenance and shift, the demographics of the Italians in Australia, language attitudes in Singapore and on the use of technology in the classroom. He is the author of the forthcoming book “Sicilians in Australia: Language shift and maintenance”, published by The Italian Australian Institute. La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia.

Professor Dr. Maya Khemlani David (Faculty of Languages and Lingusitics, University of Malaya) is an Honorary Fellow of the Chartered Institute of Linguists, United Kingdom and a honorary member of the Foundation of Endangered Languages. She is also a Member of the International Advisory Board of Linguapax and a Member of the Managing Board of The Social Capital Foundation. As a sociolinguist, Dr. David has a special interest in the languages of minority communities in Malaysia and for her work in this field was awarded the Linguapax Prize in 2007. Her publications include The Sindhis of Malaysia: A Sociolinguistic Account (2001, London, ASEAN), Politeness in Malaysian Family Talk (2008, Serdang: Universiti Putra Malaysia), Language and Human Rights: Focus on Malaysia (2007, Serdang: Universiti Putra Malaysia), Language and the Power of the Media (2006, Frankfurt, Peter Lang), Language Choices and Discourse of Malaysian Families: Case Studies of Families in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia (2006, Petaling Jaya, Strategic International and Research Development Centre), and Teaching of English in Second and Foreign Language Settings: Focus on Malaysia (2004, Frankfurt, Peter Lang).

Paolo Coluzzi ,of Milan (Italy), received his MA in minority languages in Spain from the University of Exeter (UK) and his PhD in Italian sociolinguistics from the University of Bristol (UK). At present he is working as a lecturer at the University of Brunei Darussalam. His articles have appeared in the international journals Language Problems and Language Planning, Journal of Multilingual and Multicultural Development, Modern Italy, International Journal of Multilingualism and The Linguistics Journal. His first book Minority Language Planning and Micronationalism in Italy: an Analysis of the Situation of Friulian, Cimbrian and Western Lombard with Reference to Spanish Minority Languages (Oxford: Peter Lang) was published in June 2007.

Abstract

This paper will describe the language policies, planning and implementation in selected ASEAN countries and discuss the impact of such policies on the maintenance of a number of languages. The paper will specifically examine the policies towards minority languages in Malaysia, Singapore, Brunei and the Philippines. The findings indicate that some countries have language policies that benefit some of the minority languages; while others do not seem to be doing enough to stop the shift to the majority languages. The revitalization efforts of these countries are also discussed. Language programmes in these countries show how the learning of minority endangered languages can take place in institutional or community settings. The use of ‘multiliteracies’ in such settings to revive threatened languages in new learning venues is also discussed.

Keywords: language policies, language revitalization, minority languages, multiliteracies, Malaysia, Singapore, Brunei Darussalam, the Philippines.
1 This is a substantially revised version of the papers presented by Maya Khemlani David and Paolo Coluzzi at the XII Foundation of Endangered Languages Conference, 24-27 September 2008, Ljouwert/Leeuwarden, Fryslân, The Netherlands.

2 Most of the paper is the work of Maya Khemlani David; Francesco Cavallaro contributed the sections on Singapore and language policies and language shift, and to the overall discussion; Paolo Coluzzi’s contribution is restricted mainly to the sections on Brunei.

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The Discursive Construction of Ethnic Identity : Sulukule Case, Turkey https://www.linguistics-journal.com/2014/01/07/the-discursive-construction-of-ethnic-identity-sulukule-case-turkey/ Tue, 07 Jan 2014 06:48:24 +0000 https://www.linguistics-journal.com/www2/2014/01/07/the-discursive-construction-of-ethnic-identity-sulukule-case-turkey/ Special Edition, September 2009,
Language, Culture and Identity in Asia.

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Title
The Discursive Construction of Ethnic Identity: Sulukule Case, Turkey

Nazlı Baykal
Süleyman Demirel University

Biodata
Nazlı Baykal is an assistant professor in the School of Foreign Languages, Süleyman Demirel University, Isparta, Turkey. Her research includes studies on sociolinguistics, gender specific language, language attitudes, critical discourse analysis, political and ideological discourse.

Abstract

In this study, the discursive strategies that are employed for the revival of ethnic identities of Romani people living in the Sulukule region in İstanbul, Turkey are investigated. As a result of the ‘gentrification’ process in the region, the residents are trying to make their voices heard by opposing to what they define as an unjust treatment of their human, social, cultural, and historical rights. The arguments put forward for this opposition to the gentrification process are analysed within the framework of discourse-historical approach outlined by Wodak (2001). What local authorities define as ‘urban regeneration’ becomes ethnic cleansing in the words of the residents of the gentrified area. The study is an attempt to combine the notions of architecture with the methods of discourse analysis to emphasize the discoursal and societal effects of a city planning project discussing one more time the multi-disciplinary nature of critical discourse analysis studies.

Key Words: critical discourse analysis, discourse-historical approach, ethnic identity, urban regeneration, gentrification

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